The latest sign of changing attitudes.

Once a week or so we come across yet another sign that Millennials care much less about car ownership than previous generations. They're less likely to drive than their parents. They've got less debt tied up in cars. They'd rather hang out with their friends on Twitter than get in a car to go see them.

And here's yet another: Ask Millennials which piece of technology they could least live without, and it turns out they'd more happily part with their cars than their computers or cell phones. That question, graphed below, comes from the third installment of Zipcar's annual Millennial survey.

According to those results, which are based on a national online survey of 1,015 adults, cars are the most prized piece of technology (at least among those offered here) among every age group but the under-35s. Our other big takeaway from this report: No one cares about the lonely TV any more.

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