Reuters

The country once boasted Africa's largest network. Now much is out of service, thanks to mismanagement and neglect.

At one point, Sudan was home to Africa's largest rail network. More than 3,100 miles of track stretched from the Egyptian border to Darfur, from Port Sudan on the Red Sea coast to Wau in what is now South Sudan. No longer. According to Reuters:

Today, after decades of mismanagement and neglect, most of the country's rail track is out of service. But the government, with the help of Chinese money and expertise, wants to rebuild it and restore some of the industry's former glory.

Below, images from the train system's past and present:

A Southern Sudanese girl waits near a train before she travels to South Sudan, in Khartoum in October, 2011. The trip was donated by the United Nations and implemented by the Sudanese government. South Sudan split away from the north on July 9 to create Africa's newest nation after southerners voted for secession under terms of a peace deal reached in 2005 to end a north-south civil war. (Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)
An old out of service train is seen parked at Sudan Railway maintenance complex in Khartoum on February 4, 2013. (Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)
A Southern Sudanese family sits on a train to Baher Al Gazal State in South Sudan, in Khartoum in January 2011. (Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)
Chinese workers are seen at Shanghai Huibo factory as President Omar al-Bashir attends the factory's opening ceremony in Kartoum. The factory is in charged of the manufacturing of railways lines for the development of Sudan's railways. (Reuters)

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