London Cycling Campaign has a free design tip.

The London Cycling Campaign, the British capital's biker advocacy group, doesn't build trucks.

But that doesn't mean it can't offer some free design tips. Say cheerio to the "Safer Urban Lorry," -- that's British English for truck -- a redesign whose modifications could reduce the number of injuries and deaths for urban cyclists. Though trucks make up only five percent of Greater London's vehicles, they are responsible for 50 percent of the city's cyclist fatalities.

The LCC-designed truck has a lower cab and larger windows in front and to the sides, to help drivers have a better view of their immediate surroundings. It also has lower bumper clearance, so that in the event of a collision, a cyclist is more likely to be pushed forward than thrown beneath the wheels.

Cameras mounted on the sides of the truck, linked to a screen in the cab, further help to eradicate the driver's blind spots.

The LCC keeps an interactive map measuring which London boroughs are doing the most to prevent bicycle deaths, including standards for vehicle design and courses in cyclist awareness for municipal truck drivers.

All images courtesy London Cycling Campaign.

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