Daily tous les jours

Playground furniture for grownups, too, that reminds city-dwellers how to cooperate.

The Dirt, the blog of the American Society of Landscape Architects, points us to the below delightful video from the Canadian design studio Daily tous les jours, which created in Montreal a sidewalk swing set that's also a massive musical instrument. As the creators explain on the website for the project, called 21 Balançoires:

When in motion, each swing in the series triggers different notes and, when used all together, the swings compose a musical piece in which certain melodies emerge only through cooperation.

We love this playful take on cooperation between strangers, an essential element of navigating any city sidewalk (we also love that an animal behavior professor from the Université du Québec was involved in designing this). The installation, as Daily tous les jours puts it, serves as a mechanism for stimulating public ownership of this strip of sidewalk in the city center.

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