A corral with enough room for 16 bicycles replaces a single car parking space.

New York City is busy gearing up for the long-delayed launch of its bike-share program on an undisclosed date in the next few weeks, with some 5,000 people signing up for annual memberships in the first 28 hours that they were available. In the meantime, the city keeps quietly pushing ahead building new bike infrastructure for people who have bikes of their own already.

The latest addition is a first for the city, and possibly even the country. In the Manhattan neighborhood of Hell’s Kitchen, bike parking corrals, rather than parked cars, are being used to protect bike lanes. Three new corrals were just installed alongside the bike lane on Ninth Avenue in response to community requests for more bike parking.

In this video by Clarence Eckerson of Streetfilms, local safe-streets advocate Christine Berthet explains that the corrals address a need in a densely populated part of town famous for its many restaurants. These days, there are so many bikes in Hell’s Kitchen that racks on narrow sidewalks can’t handle the volume, and pedestrians were getting crowded out. A corral with enough room for 16 bicycles replaces a single car parking space.

Local restaurant managers, many of whom employ large fleets of delivery cyclists, are enthusiastic, as the video shows. "It's more beautiful, more organized," says one woman who works at a Thai place called Zoob Zib.

"This is good," adds the owner of Italian restaurant Casa di Isacco. "This is perfect for New York."

(Full disclosure: I used to work for Streetfilms’ sister publication, Streetsblog.)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a tiny house in Oregon
    Design

    How Amazon Could Transform the Tiny House Movement

    Could the e-commerce giant help turn small-home living from a niche fad into a national housing solution?

  2. The downtown St. Louis skyline.
    Perspective

    Downtown St. Louis Is Rising; Black St. Louis Is Being Razed

    Square co-founder Jack Dorsey is expanding the company’s presence in St. Louis and demolishing vacant buildings on the city’s north side.

  3. an aerial view of Los Angeles shows the complex of freeways, new construction, familiar landmarks, and smog in 1962.
    Transportation

    The Problem With Amazon’s Cheap Gas Stunt

    The company promoted its TV show The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel with a day of throwback 1959-style prices in Los Angeles. What could go wrong?

  4. Environment

    What U.S. Cities Facing Climate Disaster Risks Are Least Prepared?

    New studies find cities most vulnerable to climate change disasters—heat waves, flooding, rising seas, drought—are the least prepared.

  5. a photo of Housing Secretary Ben Carson in Baltimore in July.
    Equity

    How HUD Could Dismantle a Pillar of Civil Rights Law

    The Department of Housing and Urban Development plans to revise the “disparate impact” rule, which could fundamentally reshape federal fair housing enforcement.  

×