Shutterstock/Yuri Arcurs

Virgin America's plan to get customers chatting.

Commercial air travel is known more for its tedium than for its romantic potential. But that may be changing.

Just kidding, of course that's not changing. But Virgin America does have a new in-flight feature whereby the Casanova in row 19 can send you a drink, and then maybe a follow-up text like "Hey, r u enjoying the vodka soda?"

It's called "seat-to-seat," and it is debuting on Virgin's Los Angeles-Las Vegas service. Virgin even has a contest going called "Get Lucky," to see who comes off the plane with the best story or... photograph [PDF].

This might sound creepy to you, but remember, it's intended for the L.A.-to-Vegas weekend crowd. Owner Richard Branson even made this weird video to explain:

Top image: Shutterstock/Yuri Arcurs.

HT: WKMG Orlando.

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