Nearly 70 percent of those fatalities were men; people over 75 were also at higher risk of getting hit.

The conflict between human and car isn't new, and unfortunately the car all too often wins. From 2001 to 2010, over 47,000 pedestrians in the United States died from motor vehicles, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Over half of these fatalities were men (69 percent), and rates were highest among people over 75 and among American Indian/Alaska Natives. Other studies have shown that the poor are also more likely to be injured by motor vehicles.

The charts below from the report break down this data by sex, age, and race. The y-axis shows the annualized motor vehicle-related pedestrian death rates, and the x-axis breaks pedestrians down by age. The colors indicate race/ethnicity. The first-glance takeaway is obvious: old people are more likely than young people to die as a result of motor-vehicles.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    How Poor Americans Get Exploited by Their Landlords

    American landlords derive more profit from renters in low-income neighborhoods, researchers Matthew Desmond and Nathan Wilmers find.

  2. An illustration of a private train.
    Transportation

    Let’s Buy a Train

    If you dream of roaming the U.S. in a your own personal train car, you still can. But Amtrak cuts have railcar owners wondering if their days are numbered.

  3. Solar panels on the tiled roof of a two-story house.
    Environment

    Solar Batteries Are Winning Over German Homeowners

    Solar home storage has morphed from a niche product in Germany to one with enormous mainstream potential.

  4. A Mormon temple with two spires, at dusk.
    Design

    Understanding the New Mormon Temple in Rome

    Despite its olive trees and piazza, the new temple will look familiar to American eyes.

  5. A photo of the interior of a WeWork co-working office.
    Design

    WeWork Wants to Build the ‘Future of Cities.’ What Does That Mean?

    The co-working startup is hatching plans to deploy data to reimagine urban problems. In the past, it has profiled neighborhoods based on class indicators.