Nearly 70 percent of those fatalities were men; people over 75 were also at higher risk of getting hit.

The conflict between human and car isn't new, and unfortunately the car all too often wins. From 2001 to 2010, over 47,000 pedestrians in the United States died from motor vehicles, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Over half of these fatalities were men (69 percent), and rates were highest among people over 75 and among American Indian/Alaska Natives. Other studies have shown that the poor are also more likely to be injured by motor vehicles.

The charts below from the report break down this data by sex, age, and race. The y-axis shows the annualized motor vehicle-related pedestrian death rates, and the x-axis breaks pedestrians down by age. The colors indicate race/ethnicity. The first-glance takeaway is obvious: old people are more likely than young people to die as a result of motor-vehicles.

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