Qantas/Droga5

Qantas Airways' new literary marketing strategy.

You've got a long flight coming up. Will you take this occasion to finally get started with Infinite Jest, and risk merely scratching the surface, forcing yourself to start all over again on your next flight? Or humbly bring along a short story from a magazine, and find yourself with hours to read Skymall?

This may or may not be a real problem, but it has a real solution: Australian airline Qantas's new literary advertising campaign, for which they commissioned works of fiction whose reading time corresponds exactly (or at least, as close as possible given variable human reading speeds) to particular flights.

The campaign is the work of agency Droga5 Sydney, which according to AdAge, calculated average words-per-minute speeds, and factored in time for bathroom and meal breaks on longer flights. The subjects of the books are intended for Qantas's "readership," which tends to be male. Hence: thrillers, non-fiction, and crime.

Top image via AdAge. HT BI Getting There.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a highway
    Transportation

    Americans Are Spending Billions on Bad Highway Expansions

    PIRG’s annual list of “highway boondoggles” includes nine transportation projects that will cost a total of $25 billion while driving up emissions.

  2. A rendering of Quayside, the waterfront development now being planned for Toronto.
    Solutions

    A Big Master Plan for Google's Growing Smart City

    Google sibling company Sidewalk Labs has revealed its master plan for the controversial Quayside waterfront development—and it’s a lot bigger.

  3. a photo of Zurich, Switzerland
    Life

    Death to Livability!

    What does it really mean when certain kinds of cities keep getting ranked as the world’s “most livable”?

  4. Design

    Revisiting Pittsburgh’s Era of Big Plans

    A conversation with the trio of authors behind a new book about the Steel City’s mid-20th-century transformation.

  5. Life

    McDonald's Restaurants Are America's Ultimate 'Third Places'

    Americans have fewer and fewer spaces to gather. That’s where nuggets come in.

×