Trains, trams, streetcars and the people who ride them play a starring role in this kinetic 3-minute film.

I don’t think filmmaker Alessandro Della Bella intended to make a video about transit in Zurich, but trains, trams, streetcars and the people who ride them are the clear stars in this hyper-fun time-lapse video.

Frenetic Zurich is one of three videos so far in a larger work.  Says Della Bella about the project as a whole:

'Helvetia by Night’ is a time-lapse project about Switzerland by night. Short videos of long nights present you the stunning beauty of the Swiss Alps and show you the magic of a spectacular nighttime sky. Imagine watching a slide-show at fast speed or looking at a flip book. It is photography turning into a movie. Everything in the videos is real and happening out there while most of us are sleeping.

You won’t see the Alps in this one, but you will definitely see urbanism in action.  Enjoy:

This post originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard blog, an Atlantic partner site.

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