Shutterstock/ForestPath

Double the fines for bikers that break traffic laws ... and the drivers that door them.

The stand-off between drivers and cyclists -- each wants the other to feel the wrath of the law; each feels slighted by the current state of infrastructure -- seems totally intractable.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has a old-fashioned quid pro quo solution: double all the fines on everyone!

That's the gist of his proposal yesterday, reported in the Chicago Tribune, which seems to respond to criticism from drivers that bikers are getting all the new infrastructure (a few new bike lanes) without any of the responsibilities.

Here's Emanuel, ever the dealmaker: double fines for cyclists who disobey traffic laws (from $25 to $50, with a $200 maximum). Double fines for drivers who "door" cyclists ($500 to $1,000). And stickers on the windows of every cab reminding passengers to look before they open the door.

Will it stop cyclists from breaking traffic laws or drivers from running them over?

Top image: Shutterstock/ForestPath.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. The Presidio Terrace neighborhood
    POV

    The Problem of Progressive Cities and the Property Tax

    The news that a posh San Francisco street was sold for delinquent taxes exposes the deeper issue with America’s local revenue system.

  2. Equity

    The Kushner Rent Gouging Lawsuit Highlights A Bigger Problem

    “[It] speaks to the dire lack of enforcement in New York City, which is exacerbating our affordable housing crisis.”

  3. Equity

    The Complex Relationship Between Innovation and Economic Segregation

    It’s not just the tech industry that’s responsible for America’s stratifying cities.

  4. Times Square, 1970.
    Life

    The New York That Belonged to the City

    Hyper-gentrification turned renegade Manhattan into plasticine playground. Can the city find its soul again?

  5. POV

    Grenfell Was No Ordinary Accident

    The catastrophic fire that killed at least 80 in London was the inevitable byproduct of an ideology that vilified the poor.