The question of taxis vs. bicycles, answered in graphs.

Dorothy Rabinowitz isn't the only one making videos about Citi Bike, the New York City bikeshare program that debuted last month.

Filmmaker Casey Neistat has turned a more analytical eye towards the program (he uses numbers), with the premise: Getting to work in New York City is a pain in the ass. Is Citi Bike a pain in the ass?

Neistat has a considerable reputation in the cycling community. His video on the ease of stealing a bike, picked up by the New York Times, are instant classics, and his demonstration of the ills of New York City bike lanes has been viewed more than 6 million times.

So what does he think of Citi Bike? I won't spoil the suspense. Like all of the Neistat's videos, it's fun to watch.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo-illustration of several big-box retail stores.
    Equity

    After the Retail Apocalypse, Prepare for the Property Tax Meltdown

    Big-box retailers nationwide are slashing their property taxes through a legal loophole known as "dark store theory." For the towns that rely on that revenue, this could be a disaster.

  2. Equity

    Housing Can’t Be Both Affordable and a Good Investment

    The two pillars of American housing policy are fundamentally at odds.

  3. A photo of a mural in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
    Life

    Stop Complaining About Your Rent and Move to Tulsa, Suggests Tulsa

    In an effort to beef up the city’s tech workforce, the George Kaiser Family Foundation is offering $10,000, free rent, and other perks to remote workers who move to Tulsa for a year.

  4. A photo of protesters carrying anti-Amazon posters during a rally and press conference in NYC.
    Amazon HQ2

    Amazon’s HQ2 Decision Was Always About Transit

    In the end, New York’s MTA and D.C.’s Metro were the only transportation networks capable of handling such an influx of new residents. But both cities will have some work to do.

  5. Rendering of a 65-story glass skyscraper in Quebec City seen at night.
    Design

    The Skyscraper Dividing Quebec City

    Le Phare would stand 65-stories high in Sainte-Foy, an old, low-lying suburb of the historic city.