The question of taxis vs. bicycles, answered in graphs.

Dorothy Rabinowitz isn't the only one making videos about Citi Bike, the New York City bikeshare program that debuted last month.

Filmmaker Casey Neistat has turned a more analytical eye towards the program (he uses numbers), with the premise: Getting to work in New York City is a pain in the ass. Is Citi Bike a pain in the ass?

Neistat has a considerable reputation in the cycling community. His video on the ease of stealing a bike, picked up by the New York Times, are instant classics, and his demonstration of the ills of New York City bike lanes has been viewed more than 6 million times.

So what does he think of Citi Bike? I won't spoil the suspense. Like all of the Neistat's videos, it's fun to watch.

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