A train delay you can get behind.


Photo via @NYCTSubwayScoop on Twitpic 

Update: Both kittens were rescued Thursday evening and have been taken to the Animal Care and Control Center in East New York, as reported by the New York Post. 

A pair of kittens wandered onto the train tracks at Brooklyn’s Church Avenue station this morning, causing over an hour of service disruptions on the B and Q lines.

According to NBC4 New York, transit workers reportedly went down into the tracks and tried to coax the cats into carrying cases. Commuter Kalina Roberts told NBC that she watched the kittens run back and forth on the tracks for an hour while waiting for the trains to start running again. She said,  "The man's like, 'Come here kittens ... and like, he's scaring the cat so they're not going to come out."

Indeed, the kittens sneaked away. There's been no updates on their whereabouts, but the New York Post reports they've not been struck by a subsequent train. Here are some reactions from riders:

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