A hilariously creative effort to stop cars at red lights.

On the chaotic streets of La Paz, Bolivia, crosswalks come alive to help ensure pedestrian safety.

Each year since 2001, the city has employs hundreds of high-risk youth to work as "traffic zebras." Dressed in full-body costumes and trained in street performance, the zebras jump into the crosswalks when the light turns red, making sure that vehicles stop fully and pedestrians can cross the streets safely. Watch a crew of traffic zebras in action:

Another sighting a few days ago: 

As the Christian Science Monitor reports, the traffic zebra program is part of a larger initiative that places thousands of 15-to-22-year-olds in city improvement jobs. Traffic zebras work four hours a day, five days a week, and receive health insurance and about $57 monthly. 

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