Options galore.

Back in April, The Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority launched a map redesign competition to see how Boston's current subway map could be re-imagined and improved. The initiative immediately drew criticism for not offering any compensation to designers, but as we found out yesterday, the controversy didn’t starve the MBTA of painstakingly-designed entries.

In a new survey, the MBTA invites the public to vote for their favorite design among the six finalists chosen by a panel of MBTA representatives, academics, urban planners, and "mapping aficionados." The MBTA expects to announce the winner by the end of the month, but makes no guarantee that the crowd favorite will be adopted as the new map. The survey closes on September 20.

The six finalists (click to see a larger version):

The rest of the entries can be viewed here

All images courtesy of MBTA. 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a cyclist on the streets of Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood.
    Equity

    Can Historic Preservation Cool Down a Hot Neighborhood?

    The new plan to landmark Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood aims to protect more than just buildings: It’s designed to curb gentrification.

  2. A cat lays flat on a bench at a park on the outskirts of Tokyo.
    Life

    Why Don't Americans Use Their Parks at Night?

    Most cities aren’t fond of letting people use parks after dark. But there are good lifestyle, environmental, and safety reasons to reconsider.

  3. Rows of machinery with long blue tubes and pipes seen at a water desalination plant.
    Environment

    A Water-Stressed World Turns to Desalination

    Desalination is increasingly being used to provide drinking water around the globe. But it remains expensive and creates its own environmental problems.

  4. a photo of a woman covering her ears on a noisy NYC subway platform
    Life

    My Quixotic Quest for Quiet in New York City

    In a booming city, the din of new construction and traffic can be intolerable. Enter Hush City, an app to map the sounds of silence.   

  5. Design

    What Cities Can Do to Help Birds and Bees Survive

    Pollinators—the wildlife that shuffle pollen between flowers—are being decimated. But they may still thrive with enough help from urban humans.

×