Reuters

Workers say the late leader's face popped up on some rocks deep in the Caracas transit tunnels.

Though Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez died in March, his successor Nicolas Maduro says he's still "everywhere." Everywhere, it turns out, means even in the rocks deep below Caracas, where workers are busy carving out a new subway tunnel.

Maduro claims that late one night this week, workers briefly saw the late leader's face appear in the rocks. "Just as it appeared, so it disappeared. So you see, what you say is right, Chavez is everywhere, we are Chavez, you are Chavez," Maduro said during a live TV event.

Luckily, a worker snapped a photo with his phone before it disappeared. See for yourself below:

Before rising the ranks of national politics, Maduro got his start in the city's Caracas Metro system, first as a bus driver and then as a labor leader. As local elections approach in December, this transportation revelation is perhaps being peddled as a blessing of the new Maduro administration from his former mentor. Had Maduro started out as a waiter, maybe we would have been treated to a Jesus-in-toast vision of Chavez instead.

Watch Maduro explain the Chavez-in-the-tunnels appearance in the video below (in Spanish).

All images via Miraflores Palace/Reuters.

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