Chris Coleman

It would be way more beautiful.

Next time you're feeling down about the chaos of public transit – the crowded cars, the ambiguous smells, the lack of air conditioning – here is a perfect antidote: a beautiful portrayal of commuting by train, as caught by a 3D scanner.

Chris Coleman made the below six-minute video, with sound design by George Cicci, at the request of the Denver Theater District and Denver Digerati. To make it, he took a handheld 3D scanning device and laptop along on his daily commute on the Denver Light Rail. He scanned train cars by walking from one end to the other, and train stations by briefly ambling through them between stops.

Multiple trips are distilled and abstracted into the video, producing an effect not unlike "the disconnection one has while riding public transport." Enjoy the result... which reminds us that there is not much we wouldn't rather see through the eyes of a 3D scanner:


METRO Re/De-construction from Chris Coleman on Vimeo.

Hat tip ANIMAL New York.

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