Starbucks

In Switzerland, the coffee giant is about to become even more ubiquitous.

Finding a Starbucks is about to become even easier -- that is, if you’re a commuter in Switzerland.

Today, the coffee company and Swiss Federal Railways unveiled the first ever Starbucks store on a train. The double-decker cafe will offer the chain's signature beverages and pastries, and can seat up to 50 people. The first level boasts baristas and a standing bar, perfect for short trips. Floor two has a roomy lounge area, meant for longer journeys. According to Fast Company, various small touches were added to prevent beverage spillage -- for example, tables have a textured surface, and grooves to hold drinks.

The Starbucks train will make its first trip on November 21 at 6:36 a.m., from the Geneva Airport to St. Gallen in Switzerland. While Starbucks won’t be boarding any other trains in the near future, a company spokeswoman did tell USA Today the concept will be tested for wider roll-out later on. 

All aboard! 

All images courtesy of Starbucks

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