And also ones that look like zippers.

In Baltimore, the well-worn zebra crosswalk just got a whimsical facelift. Yesterday, the city unveiled a set of new "hopscotch crosswalks" at an intersection by the historic Bromo Selzer Arts Tower.  

via Graham Coreil-Allen/Flickr 
via Graham Coreil-Allen/Flickr 

Designed by artist Graham Coreil-Allen, the hopscotch court is one of four new designs to adorn streets near the Tower. Another artist created crosswalks that look like giant, opening zippers.

These crosswalk "hacks" are part of the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts's effort to draw in more visitors to the new Westside Arts and Entertainment District.

(h/t NPR)

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