Stylish spots that intensely fashionable Muscovites will love.

The world may imagine Moscow's subway system as Stalin's luxurious gift to the proletariat. But the architect for the under-construction Kozhuhovskaya line says many of the expansions since Stalin's death amount to a "mishmash" that "is just awful." So he designed a series of incredibly stylish stations that intensely fashionable Muscovites will love.

Alexander Vigdorov recently explained the idea behind his new station designs to Russian magazine Afish (Google Translate works pretty well for this site). The designs combine a love for technology, opulence, and art deco interiors. And models.

"Kosino" station

Moscow's transit system carries more than six million riders a day and a higher-than-usual amount of stray dog. But Vigdorov's snazzy renderings make the new station platforms look more like catwalks with carefully placed models (they only pose like that when they're working, right?). 

Each station will have a slightly different design because, as Vigdoro tells Afish, he wants commuters to instinctively know where they are as soon as the doors open.

By the end of 2015, Moscow Metro should have a completed Kozhuhovskaya line, giving commuters more chances to avoid the city's horrendous traffic jams and erratic drivers.

"Saltykovskaya Ulitsa" station
"Nekrasovka" station
"Ferganskaya" station
"Okskaya Ulitsa" station
"Stakhanovskaya" station
"Nizhegorodskaya Ulitsa" station
"Aviamotornaya" station

All images courtesy Mosinzhproekt

H/T Calvert Journal

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