If only he'd made this a central plank in his campaign for mayor! (And not been an Internet skeezball.)

In 2011, then-Representative Anthony Weiner broke bread with then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. According to The New York Times, Weiner is alleged to have said this during the meeting: "When I become mayor, you know what I’m going to spend my first year doing? I’m going to have a bunch of ribbon-cuttings tearing out your [expletive] bike lanes."

It appears the former congressman and mayoral candidate has changed his tune about bikes. Yesterday, he posted this picture on Facebook: 

With this caption: 

The President is right. Lots of ways to make the tax code more fair. How about increasing the credit for employers who make it easier for workers to bike to work?

If only he'd made this a central plank in his campaign for mayor! (And not been an Internet skeezball.)

H/t Paul Blumenthal 

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