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And can drive at least a mile.

Canadian winters are cold. Some days, they're even Mars-level cold. All this chill and snow can be tough on cars. To prove the cold weather mettle of their batteries, Canadian Tire's ad team put them to the ultimate test. They put them in a pickup truck made of ice.

Sculpted by Ontario-based Iceculture, the final truck clocked in at a whopping 15,000 pounds. The 11,000 pounds of ice were joined to a specially welded truck bed, designed to minimize cracking and prevent the exhaust from melting the icy body.

As a final touch, the team took to the roads, driving 1.6 kilometers at an average speed of 20 kilometers per hour. Check out more of the construction and maiden voyage in the videos below.

(h/t Gizmodo). Top image via Facebook.

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