Facebook

And can drive at least a mile.

Canadian winters are cold. Some days, they're even Mars-level cold. All this chill and snow can be tough on cars. To prove the cold weather mettle of their batteries, Canadian Tire's ad team put them to the ultimate test. They put them in a pickup truck made of ice.

Sculpted by Ontario-based Iceculture, the final truck clocked in at a whopping 15,000 pounds. The 11,000 pounds of ice were joined to a specially welded truck bed, designed to minimize cracking and prevent the exhaust from melting the icy body.

As a final touch, the team took to the roads, driving 1.6 kilometers at an average speed of 20 kilometers per hour. Check out more of the construction and maiden voyage in the videos below.

(h/t Gizmodo). Top image via Facebook.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  2. photo: A stylish new funeral parlor called Exit Here in London.
    Design

    Death Be Not Dull

    U.K. restaurateur Oliver Peyton’s newest project, a style-forward funeral home called Exit Here, aims to shake up a very traditional industry.

  3. Transportation

    What Happens When a City Tries to End Traffic Deaths

    Several years into a ten-year “Vision Zero” target, some cities that took on a radical safety challenge are seeing traffic fatalities go up.

  4. Life

    Talent May Be Shifting Away From Superstar Cities

    According to a new analysis, places away from the coasts in the Sunbelt and West are pulling ahead when it comes to attracting talented workers.

  5. photo: Chris Burden's "Urban Light," installed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, features several of L.A.'s historic streetlight styles.
    Design

    The Future of the Streetlight Might Be in the Past

    A new competition from the L.A. mayor’s office invites designers to reimagine the rich history of civic illumination and create next-generation streetlights.

×