Flickr/David Orban

The latest provocation in San Francisco.

When the city of San Francisco reached an agreement last week with the big tech companies operating private shuttles at public bus stops (a deal with some fascinating implications), city Supervisor Scott Wiener made a succinct plea for peace between the Googles and Facebooks and their increasingly antagonized neighbors to the north.

"We need to stop politicizing people's ability to get to work," he said. Meaning: Protesters need to stop taking out their grievances over widening inequality in San Francisco on the Google Bus.

This is a fair way to characterize the bizarre scene of activists blockading a shuttle of computer programmers on their way to the office (imagine if you had no context for this devolving saga: How would that episode look?). But since last week, Google itself seems to have only made the matter worse, attaching yet more messy symbolism to the company bus.

According to Reuters, Google now appears to be monitoring its bus stops with private security guards. And not just your standard-issue security guards: cagey men in plainclothes sporting the kind of earpieces more often seen on the Secret Service. Here's how Reuters describes the odd development:

On two successive days this week, a pair of young men stood on a San Francisco street waiting for the special "Gbus" that ferries Google staffers to the Internet company's Mountain View headquarters 34 miles to the South.

Dressed casually in jeans and wearing black ski hats or hoods, the two men did not stand out from the dozens of other young tech workers waiting for the Google bus. On close inspection, each sported the curly wire of an earpiece, and one occasionally jotted notes down on a yellow stick-it pad.

...Asked if they were security guards for Google buses, one of the men replied "Can I see your badge?" likely referring to the Google identification badges that employees of the company use to board the bus and enter buildings on the Google campus. The other man denied working as a security guard for Google, but declined to provide any information about his identity or his employer.

The optics here are just so bad: not only do Google's employees need to be transported away from San Francisco, they need to be protected from it. Not only does the company need its own transportation, it needs its own security, too – even on public sidewalks already patrolled by the San Francisco Police Department.

It seems highly unlikely that Google's employees actually need such a precaution. But if Google thinks that they do, well, that's just one more glaring disconnect between how the company sees the city and how the city perceives itself.

MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson hits on what's off about this picture:

Google has a perception problem in San Francisco that it's driving some of the city's problems (like its rising rent) even as it holds itself apart from the community there. The worst thing it can do at this point is to further confirm those suspicions.

Top image: Flickr user David Orban.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo-illustration of several big-box retail stores.
    Equity

    After the Retail Apocalypse, Prepare for the Property Tax Meltdown

    Big-box retailers nationwide are slashing their property taxes through a legal loophole known as "dark store theory." For the towns that rely on that revenue, this could be a disaster.

  2. Life

    Inside the Movement to Derail Amazon HQ2 Incentives

    New York and Virginia politicians and activists could still make changes to Amazon HQ2 packages—or at least stop the next bidding war from mirroring this one.

  3. A photo of a small small house in San Francisco's Noe Valley that sold for $1.8 million in 2014.
    Equity

    Why Cities Must Tackle Single-Family Zoning

    As cities wake up to their housing crises, the problems with single-family-home residential zoning will become too egregious to ignore.

  4. A photo of British Prime Minister Theresa May announcing her government's Brexit deal outside No. 10 Downing Street
    Equity

    The Bitterest Lesson of the Brexit Deal

    Amid resignations, it's clear the U.K. government massively misjudged how leaving the European Union would play out.

  5. A man holding a toddler walks past open-house signs in front of condominiums for sale.
    Life

    Millennials Are More Likely to Buy Their First Homes in Cities

    New research finds that Millennials are 21 percent more likely to buy their first homes near city centers than Generation X.