Associated Press

Poor planning led to overheated stations and overcrowded platforms.

Last night's big game was billed as the first "mass-transit Super Bowl." But for attendees who arrived via train, it was nothing short of a sweaty, claustrophobic nightmare.

People complained of packed, overheated stations and immobile lines. The post-Game crowds were so big that MetLife stadium asked fans to remain in the venue until the train station cleared out.

The NFL and New Jersey Transit had been expecting somewhere between 12,000 and 15,000 ticket holders to arrive at MetLife Stadium by train. In reality, a record-breaking 28,000 passengers took public transit to the Meadowlands, more than at any other time in the venue's history.

Strict parking restrictions made entry far more complicated than usual. Because of the "no drop-off zone," dozens of ticket holders arrived on foot after their cabs left them near the stadium. They were promptly turned away by police and told they needed to buy shuttle bus seats in order to get past the security perimeter.

Crowds trickled out of East Rutherford after the game, which ended just before 10 pm. An estimated 13,000 people were able to leave by train before 11:30 pm. The bulk of attendees were out by 12:45 am. Since it was a particularly lopsided Super Bowl (Seattle beat Denver 43 to 8), disappointed Broncos fans may well have left early, easing the congestion. Had 82,529 in attendance left all at once, it's safe to say last night's mass transit low-lights could have been much worse.

Video courtesy NJ.com

Video courtesy NJ.com

Top image: Football fans wait to go through security at the Secaucus Junction, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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