Bike lanes, bike shares, pedestrian safety laws, and more.

Filmmaker Todd Drezner was inspired to make a documentary about the future of traffic while stuck in hopeless gridlock between New York and Connecticut. He wanted to know whether it's going to get worse and what cities can do about it.

But once he started digging, Drezner realized the issue is bigger -- it's really about city streets reinventing themselves. Since last June, the director has been filming In Transit, capturing footage of urban planners trying to sell pedestrian and bike-friendly streets to skeptical communities in Detroit and New York.

But streets aren't changing in those two cities alone; it's happening all over the country. That's why Drezner started a Kickstarter campaign to support filming in more cities -- Los Angeles and San Francisco, for example. The campaign, which ends tomorrow, is currently about $2,500 shy of reaching its goal.  

Here's the trailer.

Top image: screenshot from film trailer

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