Flickr/Alan Levine

Never awkwardly stuff your backpack into a front rack again.

The manufacturers of the Bixi — that ubiquitous bike-share technology in a dozen cities, including New York, D.C., and Chicago — are proud of the "attractive and practical luggage rack" they provide for the front of each bike.

But it turns out that 17-pound front rack has pretty awkward proportions. It's narrowness makes it tough to stuff your backpack in there. And the bungee cord that secures your items goes over the top, squashing tall bags.

Never fear. In the next few months, two companies (one inspired by New York's Citi Bike, the other by Chicago's Divvy system) are rolling out new bags specifically designed for this urban commuting challenge.

The first bag, from designers Adrian Garcia and Blake Larson, is a tall and narrow pouch that is secured to the rack with a convertible, thick strap. The two are currently running a Kickstarter to fund the A.B. Pack (named, they tell SF Weekly, after both designers, and because bike-share gets you from point A to point B). A pledge of $39 will get you a canvas bag, $49 a weatherproof vinyl version, and $60 a customizable, city-specific design celebrating New York or Chicago.

Kickstarter

Check out the specs below:

Kickstarter

The second hack comes from Chicago-based industrial designer Maria Boustead's bag company Po Campo. This summer she's rolling out an $85 Bike Share Bag. It looks a lot more like a normal work bag, but the built-in bungee straps that hook around the front allow a lot bigger bag to fit in that narrow rack.

Po Campo

Top Image Courtesy Flickr user Alan Levine.

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