Jinais Ponnampadikkal Kader/Youtube

Gross.

That the city is filled with rats is a fact we’d prefer to bury in the back of our minds. Not so fast, says one particularly trouble-making rodent who caused quite a scene in a New York City subway train yesterday morning.

Jinais Ponnampadikkal Kader, who was riding the A train from Manhattan to Brooklyn, managed to record his fellow passengers' reactions to the sneaky creature.

In the description of his Youtube post, Kader writes: "Someone getting off the train was screaming 'RAT on the train!' but by the time everyone realized what was happening, the doors closed and the train entered the tunnel."

Dun dun dun -- and that's how you get a bunch of grown adults to scream and sob on their morning commute.

(h/t NYMag)

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