Aaron Cassara

Faster than walking, less of a hassle than biking, and way cheaper than a car.

When most people hear the word “skateboard,” they think of giant wooden halfpipes, or Tony Hawk’s 900, or the thrill of the X-Games. But in big cities, skateboards are often used for more mundane reasons: sidestepping traffic, commuting to work, running errands, hitting the bars. Skating is faster than walking, less of a hassle than biking, more fun than being jostled in the subway, and way cheaper than a car.

The four skaters in this film, all deeply involved in the U.S. skateboarding community, use their beloved boards for more than just tricks. They use them to get around.

About the Author

Aaron Cassara

Aaron Cassara is an independent filmmaker and photographer living in New York. 

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