And get an estimate of how much each line would cost to run.

Remember Mini Metro, the addicting game that lets you design your own subway system? Well, now we have TransitMix, a new tool that lets you mock up your own bus lines. And whereas MinI Metro takes place in a hypothetical world, TransitMix lets you work magic on existing cities.

Developed by a group of Code for America fellows, TransitMix is conceived as “a sketching tool for transit planners (both professional and armchair) to quickly design routes and share with the public.“ To start, pick a city*.  Then, drag and drop points to snap your bus line to the street grid. And by changing variables like headway and peak hours, you get outputs like how many buses would be required during peak hours and an estimate of how much the line would cost to operate.

In the works is a much more robust version that would output information like revenue hours per day and estimated ridership. It would also let users import custom data like residential and employment density. 

The team details their work on GitHub and is looking for feedback. So, give it a go!

*At publication time, the tool seems to be having trouble navigating to cities other than San Francisco, CA. If you run into the same issue, we'd recommend trying back later. 

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