Adding some local color. Thomas Leuthard/Flickr

To enter the contest, you also have to justify your choice.

As Stockholm plans a 25.7 billion kronor ($4 billion) expansion of its subway system to deal with an expected half million new residents by 2030, the city is asking citizens to help with the design. Last month the city launched an online contest to crowdsource the color of the new metro line being added to its Tunnelbanan system.

On the site (which appears to be open to anyone with an e-mail address), you can hover your mouse over a changing field of color until you’ve found the one you like best. To enter it, you also have to justify your choice. Perhaps a rich red as a conceptual tribute to the Swedish film icon Ingmar Bergman’s Wild Strawberries?

Stockholm’s online contest to choose the color of its new metro line. Screenshot of Linjefarg.se

When submissions close on August 11, judges will pick three finalists, which will then be put to a popular vote. According to the Local, 3,400 colors have been entered so far, and the most popular are yellow, brown, purple, turquoise, and pink. The winning color with the best rationale earns its submitter a free one-year metro pass.

The current subway diagram is a familiar-looking tangle of red, blue, and green spaghetti; when the extension is completed in 2025, the green line will become blue, the blue line will turn a lighter shade, and the new line will be added in whatever color Stockholmers decide on. But if the masses choose something truly awful, there’s an escape valve, according to the fine print of the contest rules: “The color scale may need to be adjusted to adapt to the other colors on the SL map.”

This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

MORE FROM QUARTZ:

Why Business Travelers Should Think Twice About Booking Through Airbnb

How Solar Energy Storage Could Make Tesla Much More Than an Automaker

Companies That Care About Employee Happiness Have a Better Bottom Line

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick in 2016.
    Transportation

    What Uber Did

    In his new book on the “Battle for Uber,” Mike Isaac chronicles the ruthless rise of the ride-hailing company and its founding CEO, Travis Kalanick.

  2. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  3. a photo of a NYC bus
    Transportation

    Why the Bus Got So Bad, and How to Save It

    TransitCenter’s Steven Higashide has created a how-to guide to help city leaders and public transportation advocates save struggling bus systems.

  4. a photo of bikes on a bridge in Amsterdam
    Transportation

    Street by Street, Amsterdam Is Cutting Cars Out of the Picture

    Armed with a street-design tool called the knip, the Dutch capital is slashing car access in the city center, and expanding public transit hours.

  5. A photo of residents blocking a Philadelphia intersection on a July weekend in 1953.
    Perspective

    The Hidden History of American Anti-Car Protests

    A wave of traffic safety activism in the 1970s helped reshape Dutch streets. But the U.S. had its own anti-car movement earlier, led largely by women.

×