The Delhi Traffic Police tweet rhymes to spread safe driving awareness. Flickr/eggrole

Public safety reminders in the form of cute rhyming couplets.

At rush hour in the Indian capital, bicyclists and moped riders will weave through the maze created by bumper-to-bumper cars. The auto rickshaws will often chug perpendicular to the direction of traffic, carrying bouquets of school children sticking out at awkward angles. At night, the interstate cargo trucks rage across the city expressways with precariously stacked boxes that make any driver on the same road break out in nervous sweat.

It's easy to see why driving in Delhi is so often compared to a video game, and why there are so many accidents. But the Delhi Traffic Police are trying to improve the situation—by tweeting snappy rhymes reminding drivers to be alert and safe at every turn.

Some of the cute little couplets make no attempt to sugarcoat the consequences of taking risks.

There are also gentler road rule reminders.

Anil Shukla, joint commissioner of the Delhi Traffic Police department, says that they've developed a loyal following on social media. The short and sweet one-liners seem to resonate more with residents than long, boring sermons.

"Brevity is the sister of talent," he says, quoting Chekov. "Through these tweets, we're showing our talent."

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