Reaching 311 miles per hour on a test track in Japan makes for some giddy responses.

The Central Japan Railway Company has been conducting test runs this month for its Chuo Shinkansen, an experimental maglev train that can travel up to 311 mph. Curious what it feels like to ride such a fast train? Watch the video below, which follows the 100 lucky passengers who got to experience an incredibly fast ride between the cities of Uenohara and Fuefuki (27 miles apart) over the weekend.

The best part: When the train reaches peak speed (displayed on monitors inside the train), passenger giddiness ensues.

Occasional test runs on the Yamanashi test track have been taking place since 1997, but riders should savor each high-speed moment they get: Service for the first half of the ¥9 trillion Tokyo-Osaka maglev (Tokyo to Nagoya) doesn't start until 2027, and the second half (Nagoya to Osaka) in 2045.

When completed, a 300-mile trip between Tokyo and Osaka will take 67 minutes.

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