François Gissy broke his world record at 207 mph, and he's already hatching plans for a bike he calls the "Spine Crusher."

Is your Monday off to a demonic start? Last week, French daredevil François Gissy rode a rocket-powered bike to a speed of 207 mph, breaking his own 2013 world record of 177 mph. There's an insane video (below), of course. Bike-lovers will be especially pleased to watch Gissy "race" a Ferrari F430—scare quotes, since the rocket-bike overtakes the sports car in a fraction of a second, hitting the record speed in less than five.

As you can see, dude's pretty much straddling the bike's slim tank of hydrogen peroxide, which fuels the three rocket boosters in the rear, built by Swiss company Exotic Thermal Engineering. Gissy is lucky to be alive, but he's not stopping at that. "If we can find some serious sponsors, then we would like to build a monstrous bicycle, which will be called 'Spine Crusher,'" he told gizmag. "The goal would be to accelerate to more than 400 km/h (249 mph) in less than two seconds." Sounds... painful. And, OK, pretty rad.

h/t Gizmodo

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