François Gissy broke his world record at 207 mph, and he's already hatching plans for a bike he calls the "Spine Crusher."

Is your Monday off to a demonic start? Last week, French daredevil François Gissy rode a rocket-powered bike to a speed of 207 mph, breaking his own 2013 world record of 177 mph. There's an insane video (below), of course. Bike-lovers will be especially pleased to watch Gissy "race" a Ferrari F430—scare quotes, since the rocket-bike overtakes the sports car in a fraction of a second, hitting the record speed in less than five.

As you can see, dude's pretty much straddling the bike's slim tank of hydrogen peroxide, which fuels the three rocket boosters in the rear, built by Swiss company Exotic Thermal Engineering. Gissy is lucky to be alive, but he's not stopping at that. "If we can find some serious sponsors, then we would like to build a monstrous bicycle, which will be called 'Spine Crusher,'" he told gizmag. "The goal would be to accelerate to more than 400 km/h (249 mph) in less than two seconds." Sounds... painful. And, OK, pretty rad.

h/t Gizmodo

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Amazon HQ2

    Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

    The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

  2. Design

    A History of the American Public Library

    A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

  3. A photo of a new car dealership
    Transportation

    Subprime Auto Loans Are Turning Car Ownership Into a Trap

    A record 7 million Americans are three months late on their car payments, revealing what could be cracks in the U.S. economy.

  4. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  5. Life

    The Town Where Retirees Can’t Retire

    In fast-aging pockets of rural America, older residents are going back to work. But not always because they need the money.