Suraj Shrestha (C), the conductor of a women-only bus, collects the bus fare from a passenger in Kathmandu January 6, 2015. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar

The service debuted this week. For now, most of the drivers and conductors are still men.

Earlier this week, officials in Nepal's capital city announced their newest tactic against sexual harassment on public transit: women-only buses.

The city is now running four 16-seat buses exclusively for women on the busy Kalanki-Balkot route during peak hours.

Buses in Kathmandu already have designated "women only" seats but according to the BBC, the rule is poorly enforced. Worse, many women feel unsafe on the city's buses, especially during rush hour. Twenty-six percent of 19-35 year-old women responded to a 2013 World Bank survey saying that they "had experienced some form of sexual assault" on Nepal's public transit. A 21-year-old nun on a bus in eastern Nepal was gang-raped by five men, including the bus driver, in 2011.

The special buses are driven mostly by men for now. Bharat Nepal, chairman of the Bagmati Transport Entrepreneurs Association that runs the service, tells the BBC that only one of their conductors is female but that they intend on eventually having an all-female staff.

On Tuesday, Reuters photographer

A woman rides a women-only bus as she returns from her college in Kathmandu January 6, 2015. (REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar)
Women ride a women-only bus in Kathmandu January 6, 2015. (REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar)
A passenger holds a placard that reads "women-only bus service" as she travels in a women-only bus in Kathmandu January 6, 2015. (REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar)
"Seats Reserved for Women" is written in Nepali inside a women-only bus in Kathmandu January 6, 2015. (REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar)
Janak Shrestha, the driver of a women-only bus, smiles as he speaks with a passenger (unseen) in Kathmandu January 6, 2015.  (REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar)
CapPassengers travel in a women-only bus in Kathmandu January 6, 2015. (REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar)

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