A whirlwind time-lapse tour, spanning from Mexico to New Zealand.

During the past two years, Kien Lam went on the kind of trip most could only dream about. The photographer wanted to "see as much of the world as possible," so he visited 15 countries around the globe, from Mexico to New Zealand, snapping more than 10,000 photographs along the way. He edited his work together to make this stupendous time-lapse, which may be one of the most envy-inducing travel diaries I've ever seen.

This isn't Lam's first globe-hopping adventure. In 2012, he released a similar time-lapse about his first ambitious trip, which he took after he walked away from a successful career in business.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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