It's the back tire that'll get ya.

You don't need a Hollywood stunt cannon to send a car airborne.  All it takes is a speedy vehicle and one uncovered, devilishly placed manhole.

A motorcyclist at the beginning of this recent video from parts unknown narrowly avoids the pit trap in the road. But soon after a car scores a direct hit with its back tire and lurches aloft, skidding for a half-second on its bumper and showering the neighborhood with trunk litter. That got traffic to slow down.

The footage is the latest example of the evil power manholes hold over humanity, with their fire-breathing, motorist-eating, and attempted child-exploding deeds. This month alone, manholes knocked out power to thousands in Washington, D.C., staged a car-be-cue in Baltimore, caused two head injuries after exploding in Brooklyn, and forget attempted, but actually did blow a kid into the air in China.

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