M2Film

A Danish company is hellbent on making the bus seem cool.

A few years ago, we wrote about an epic public bus ad from the enthusiastic Danes of Midttrafik, a mass transit solutions company. Featuring a sexy, gravelly voiced driver, copious slow motion effects and a sweeping soundtrack, you would be right to question whether public transportation could ever look cooler.

Until now. Midtraffik and Danish production company M2Film are back with "Epic Bus - The Sequel," which features an unlikely hero: The public bus passenger himself. Watch as our goofy-looking, mop-headed protagonist cruises through life, dropping panties and drawing cheering crowds thanks to one very special vehicle: the bus.

The Copenhagen Post reports that 2014 set records for the number of cars on Danish roads. Maybe Blondie here (not to mention his friend Miss Paraguay) will change some minds—though hopefully not via Molotov cocktails.

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