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Fun fact: the Chicago Transit Authority lets people charter the city's trains for private events—just not during weekday rush hours.

Party buses are out. You know what's in? THE PARTY TRAIN.

Fun fact: If you want a really unique venue to celebrate your birthday, wedding, Bar/Bat mitzvah, or you know, Tuesday (because that's how you roll)—you can charter Chicago's 'L' train to drive around the city.

The Chicago Transit Authority has been renting the trains out for decades, says William Reilly, the general manager of rail operations. Over the years, Reilly has seen the trains used for fashion shows, rolling art museums, school tours, and conventions.

Chicago isn't the only place to throw a train party. In Los Angeles, you can rent out vintage rail cars for events. And if you already own a rail car (because some of us do), Amtrak will let you attach it to one of their trains to whiz around the country.  

But if you're going to rent a vehicle to party in, it may as well be an entire 'L' train. For one, people heart trains, while buses—not so much. Second, renting the train costs $1,800, which is not that much more expensive than your average party bus, and offers way more bang for your buck.

Plus, the 'L' is really special: it has history, charm, and offers a beautiful experience of Chicago as it snakes in between the city's buildings. (People don't write poems about it for nothing). Reilly recalls that one gentleman rented out an 'L' train to celebrate his birthday for 10 straight years until his health no longer allowed.

You could be that guy.

But keep in mind the Chicago Transit Authority has laid out some "do's" and "don't's." You and 34 other people can get together, have food, and dance to recorded or live music. But alcohol is a big NO.

And one more thing, if you are going to celebrate on a Tuesday, the CTA says, go ahead, "throw an 'L' of a party"—just not during the rush hours, because that would be obnoxious.

H/t Timeout Chicago

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