Run away from Blinky, Pinky, Inky and Clyde down nearly any Google Maps environment you wish.

For a limited time, you can finally experience Pac-Man on your favorite (or least favorite) place to navigate IRL. One of the best navigational easter eggs ever, Google Maps is currently letting users experience the world through the eyes of a Pac-Man.

Ever wished Namco created a Pierre L'Enfant-version of the arcade game? Well, D.C.'s Logan Circle now has all the Pac-Dots your Pac-Gut can handle:

Logan Circle, Washington, D.C.

William Penn designed Rittenhouse Square with Philadelphia's pedestrians in mind, but he also created one hell of a Pac-Man maze:

Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia.

Unfortunately, not all of the world's roads are available. Users should expect to be told that "it looks like Pac-Man can't play here" along various subdivisions and highways, as seen below in our attempts to play in suburban Alpharetta, Georgia, as well as where I-5 and I-10 cross paths in Los Angeles:

A subdivison in Alpharetta, Georgia.
Where I-5 and I-10 meet in Los Angeles.

Blinky, Pinky, Inky and Clyde are terrifying but not nearly as much as the idea of driving in Moscow. Consider this your best chance to turn off the dash cam and navigate the streets of Russia's capital without being passed by cars driving down the sidewalk or getting stuck in some of the world's most ridiculous traffic jams:

Central Moscow

Waste as much time at work on this distraction while you can. Google isn't saying exactly when they'll take this simple joy away from us yet.

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