Bundespolizei/Presseportal

It's like the commuter version of The Cask of Amontillado.

If Edgar Allan Poe were alive today, he could pen a chilling tale about a madman who condemned commuters to death by bricking up their subway car.

Inspiration for such a yarn just popped up in Hamburg: Somebody (or more likely, bodies) managed to lug a bunch of construction blocks into a railway station and painstakingly glue them together to seal off a door on an S-Bahn train. Many initially thought the wall was fake, but now police and railway authorities have confirmed the ballsy action.

Not that they're laughing. Workers had to shut down the train, move it to the depot, and toil for 12 hours breaking down the barrier. The damage is estimated at about 10,000 euros. Reports the Hamburger Abendblatt (via Google Translate):

It must have happened in Barmbek where the train was stopped at 8 clock in the morning on Tuesday. The 17 stones were tailored according to the Federal Police precisely to the input range and stacked professionally. "The stones were accurately measured," said federal police spokesman Carstens. "There's quite craftsmanship behind it."

According to the Federal Police, the Ytong stones were attached to each other with an adhesive and also attached to the door trim with adhesive. That there is a single offender who should have all the stones alone transported to the siding in Barmbek, keeping the police at least unlikely. The federal police began by finding that the perpetrators had climbed over a fence on the sidings....

"What looks like a joke is clearly a crime," said the railway spokeswoman.

Bundespolizei/Presseportal

Die S-Bahn Hamburg probiert neue Wege Türen außer Dienst zu nehmen... Da bekommt ja der Satz "An kalten Tagen Türen schließen." eine ganz neue Bedeutung.

Posted by Chris Zeyn on Tuesday, April 28, 2015

H/t Urbanshit

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