"I'm not busking for money. I want to share this identity, this culture."

Vong Pak, a New York-based musician, has played the Korean drum for more than 25 years. His performances blend music and dance with elements of dramatic narrative, a mixture of theatrical flair and traditional Korean folk art. "These days I'm not busking for money," he tells Jenny Schweitzer, a filmmaker. "I want to share this identity, this culture."

This is the second in a series of short documentaries about New York's subway musicians.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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