Friday night, sip some Green Line Pale Ale and place a bid on your favorite pieces of the old Madison and Wabash station.

Antiquers and transit enthusiasts of Chicago, take heed! An old L train station (well, parts of it) may be yours Friday night for the right price.

Pieces from the Madison and Wabash station, built in 1896, will be auctioned off at the Rebuilding Exchange, a reclaimed materials warehouse in Lincoln Park.

Put on Preservation Chicago’s “Most Endangered” list prior to its demolition in March, about 30 pieces of the former station will be available for auction at the nonprofit’s "Madison and Wabash Bash." Bidders will be able to sip Goose Island’s Green Line Pale Ale while vying for station railings, ornaments, sections of hardwood from the platform, and even a 1970s couch.

The most coveted piece, the station house, will be present but not for sale. That’ll stay at the Exchange for the next two years while Preservation Chicago shops around for a museum it can call home.

The Madison and Wabash station as seen in 2012. (Wikimedia Commons/David Wilson)

Ward Miller, Preservation Chicago’s executive director, hopes to see other original loop stations salvaged in one way or another as the CTA continues to modernize. "We’re talking about an elevated structure that the central business district takes its name from," Ward tells DNAinfo. "It's kind of the spine and backbone of the city."

The Madison and Wabash station and the Madison and Randolph station are being consolidated into one new stop at Washington and Wabash. The project is expected to be complete late next year.

[H/T: Curbed Chicago]

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