Yasiel Puig dives for first during a game between the Mets and Dodgers on July 3, 2015. Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY

L.A. and New York are going head to head … through their respective MTAs.

With their third consecutive division title in the bag, the Los Angeles Dodgers will face off against the New York Mets in the National League Division Series, starting October 9. Among other things, this means that the Blue Crew run the risk of sullying their pristine cleats on the filthy floors of the New York City subway.

As any concerned transit agency would, the communications team at L.A. Metro tweeted a respectful request to New York City’s MTA early Wednesday. Then MTA took a turn at bat. And, well, here’s what happened:

For transit enthusiasts, watching this exchange was a bit like watching your parents fight, as one Twitter bystander pointed out. At last, a Chicago fan intervened. The spat cooled down … for now.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a visitor posing for a photo with Elvis in downtown Nashville
    Perspective

    Cities: Don’t Fall in the Branding Trap

    From Instagram stunts to Edison bulbs, why do so many cities’ marketing plans try to convince people that they’re exactly like somewhere else?

  2. Amazon HQ2

    Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

    The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

  3. a photo of a used needle in a park in Lawrence, Massachusetts.
    Equity

    Why the Rural Opioid Crisis Is Different From the Urban One

    As deaths from heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioids soar in the U.S., a new study looks at the geographic factors driving the drug overdose epidemic.

  4. Equity

    The FBI's Forgotten War on Black-Owned Bookstores

    At the height of the Black Power movement, the Bureau focused on the unlikeliest of public enemies: black independent booksellers.

  5. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.