Yasiel Puig dives for first during a game between the Mets and Dodgers on July 3, 2015. Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY

L.A. and New York are going head to head … through their respective MTAs.

With their third consecutive division title in the bag, the Los Angeles Dodgers will face off against the New York Mets in the National League Division Series, starting October 9. Among other things, this means that the Blue Crew run the risk of sullying their pristine cleats on the filthy floors of the New York City subway.

As any concerned transit agency would, the communications team at L.A. Metro tweeted a respectful request to New York City’s MTA early Wednesday. Then MTA took a turn at bat. And, well, here’s what happened:

For transit enthusiasts, watching this exchange was a bit like watching your parents fight, as one Twitter bystander pointed out. At last, a Chicago fan intervened. The spat cooled down … for now.

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