MilsiArt/Shutterstock.com

Notices around the transit system warn of penalties for puffing on e-cigs.

Attention teens and futuristic bounty hunters, your days of huffing and puffing on the train are numbered. New signs that BART has rolled out through the Bay Area specifically target your cottony, fruit-flavored emissions:

BART

The signs went up after the transit system approved an ordinance banning e-cigarettes and other vaping gadgets earlier this year. BART explained at the time:

The action was taken to update BART's existing policy to be more in line with similar county and city-level bans, and as a courtesy to passengers who have expressed a desire for a consistent and comprehensive no-smoking policy.

“A number of complaints have reached the Board of Directors about people using electronic cigarettes and vaping devices on BART property,” said Director Robert Raburn. “Other transit providers have enacted similar prohibitions.”

It’s unknown whether this prohibition will be hardily enforced, but for those who want to see what blowing a big wad of fog at a BART cop will get you, it’s $100 for the first offense, $200 for the second in a year, and $500 for more infractions within five years.

The signs might not please those craving an 80-mph nicotine fix, but judging from complaints on Twitter they’ll be a welcome development for many:

(That last photo is from a site called BART Idiot Hall of Fame.)

Top image: MilsiArt/Shutterstock.com. H/t Muni Diaries

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