The digital NY Train Project has reached Brooklyn.

Given how much time it must take Adam Chang to visit a subway station, photograph the tile mosaic on the platform wall, and re-draw the image with a digital illustration tool, he would have been excused for quitting his NY Train Project in Manhattan. But much like the subway itself Chang never stopped, and he’s now added Brooklyn to his growing online signage collection:

Last year, I launched the project starting with Manhattan. Thanks to everyone who visited the site shared the project with others, the overwhelming reaction was very humbling. A year later, after countless hours on the train and re-illustrating the signs, I’m proud to share Brooklyn.

Chang writes that the project began with an instant appreciation for the “intricate details” and “carefully placed tiles” in the station sign at Bleecker Street. Since then Chang has spent 43 hours riding (or waiting for) the subway, passed through 276 stops, and made 19 fare card swipes. And judging by the Bronx and Queen placeholders at the NY Train Project’s main page, he’s not done yet.

Check out some of Chang’s digital renderings of Brooklyn station tiles below, or search the full collection by train or borough here.

Borough Hall (5 train)

Broadway Junction (A train)

Marcy Avenue (Z train)

Nevins Street (2 train)

York Street (F train)

36th Street (N train)

Jefferson Street (L train)

Van Siclen Avenue (J train)

Parkside Avenue (Q train)

Outer Space / Crown Heights (4 train)

All images courtesy Adam Chang / NY Train Project.

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