The biggest transportation crisis facing New York City is the result of outdated infrastructure and Superstorm Sandy.

If you’ve taken a train into or out of New York City in the recent past, you’ve surely already noticed: There’s a massive rail travel bottleneck between Newark, New Jersey, and Manhattan. The $20 billion Gateway Program aims to alleviate this crippling congestion along the Northeast Corridor by adding new tunnel access under the Hudson River.

In this first episode of Van Alen Sessions, a new series presented by Van Alen Institute with The Atlantic and CityLab, you’ll hear not only from regional experts but also frustrated commuters about just how badly a fix is needed. It’s a transportation crisis brought on by outdated infrastructure and deterioration caused by Superstorm Sandy.

About This Series: Van Alen Sessions is presented by Van Alen Institute with The Atlantic and CityLab. Season One, “Tunnel Vision,” is directed by Kelly Loudenberg. The series is made possible with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, AkzoNobel, Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Connect with Van Alen Institute on vanalen.org.

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