It was “better behaved than the majority of human riders.”

A few years ago, a behavioral scientist in Toronto warned that our war on raccoons could be making them even more powerful.

“One of the things we’re doing is providing them with bigger and bigger challenges, so you’ve probably seen raccoon-proof garbage cans and all these things to try to keep them from figuring things out,” Suzanne MacDonald told NPR. “But in fact, they always do, so humans are selecting these traits in raccoons and we’re actually shaping an uber-raccoon that is going to be able to compete in an urban environment.”

Well, Toronto’s uber-raccoons might’ve already arrived, because yesterday one was spotted chugging through the subway like it was on its way to work:

Animator Heather Leach recorded this footage at the Spadina station, where she tweets the bushy-tailed beast caused a “brief delay.” So far people seem pretty chill with the raccoon’s presence, saying it looks “better behaved than the majority of human riders” and probably “smells better than most as well.”

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