Peter Kerpedjiev

These “isochrone maps” offer an interesting look at similarities and differences in road design, and their effects on travel.

If you live in a city where public transit options are sparse, or one where they’re temporarily out of service, you might have to use a car to get around. If that’s the case, these new maps can help you gauge how long it’ll take you to get to a given point—inside or out of your city—by car.

Here are some reasons the Vienna-based doctoral student Peter Kerpedjiev made these maps:

Kerpedjiev previously created a series of “isochrone mapsof European cities, which represented public transit commuting times as concentric layers of color around each city. Essentially, the maps show how long it would take, by rail or by foot, from a particular city to another point in Europe. In a new, more geographically diverse set of maps, he’s charting travel times by car. Here’s what he says the maps are designed to show, via his blog, Empty Pipes:

The wonderful thing about portraying driving times is that it's possible to make such maps for cities from all over the world. In doing so, we can see the how the transportation infrastructure of a region meshes with the natural features to create a unique accessibility profile.

To illustrate, he uses the example of Lincoln, Nebraska, which has diamond-shaped, concentric layers surrounding it, and compares it to Vienna (where he currently lives), which has rounder layers:

The difference in the driving times has a lot to do with the way roads are designed in the two cities. In Lincoln, they intersect in grids, so it takes longer to drive from point A to point B if the points are in a diagonal line. In Vienna, on the other hand, the roads are laid in all directions, so it doesn’t take much longer to travel in any one direction versus another.

When comparing cities in different parts of the world, or even different parts of the same country, it’s interesting to see all of the factors that can potentially influence our commute, Kerpedjiev says:

The differences in accessibility between different cities of the world can range from the trivial (Denver, CO, vs Lincoln, NE) to the substantial (Perth, Australia, vs. Sydney, Australia). Individual cities can have a wide automobile-reachable area (Moscow, Russia) or a narrow, geography-, politics- and infrastructure-constrained area (Irkutsk, Russia).

Kerpedjiev’s maps only cover select cities across the world, and his travel times, he notes on his blog, are estimates based on GraphHopper and OpenStreetMap data. But they reveal a lot of great information about each city’s unique geography and particular infrastructure. Play around with others here.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    Amazon Go Might Kill More Than Just Supermarkets

    Supermarkets are community anchors. Amazon’s “just walk out” version embodies a disconcerting social transformation.

  2. Transportation

    6 Ideas for a Better New York Subway

    The beleaguered system looked outside its own ranks for ambitious new fixes.

  3. A young refugee from Kosovo stands in front of a map of Hungary with her teacher.

    Who Maps the World?

    Too often, men. And money. But a team of OpenStreetMap users is working to draw new cartographic lines, making maps that more accurately—and equitably—reflect our space.

  4. Transportation

    The Ticking Time Bomb for Suburban Retail

    Lightning-speed deliveries and autonomous cars could accelerate the current big-box implosion.

  5. A brownstone in Brooklyn, where Airbnb growth has been particularly strong in recent years.

    What Airbnb Did to New York City

    Airbnb’s effects on the city’s housing market have been dramatic, a report suggests. And other cities could soon see the same pattern.