Before fatal crashes were a fact of life, the city took a visible stance against them.

Today, marking traffic deaths is largely a private matter. Family members might erect a small roadside cross or shrine, or local artists might create something like Portland’s haunting ghost bikes.

But once upon a time, in the days before fatal crashes were a common fact of life, at least one American city officially marked each avoidable, automobile-related death. In 1938, with support from the Washington Post’s ”program to aid the fight against wanton killing,” Washington, D.C., city commissioners erected a skull-and-crossbones flag in front of city hall on every day that a fatality was reported. A white flag denoted “deathless days in traffic,” according to the Post.

It doesn’t seem like the flags flew for long, judging from newspaper archives. And it took another 70 years for city governments to make a serious, visible effort at ending traffic deaths, with initiatives like Vision Zero. “But there are eighty years of cultural expectations around street design and driving speed which make it difficult to really design streets for safety,” writes David Alpert at Greater Greater Washington.

H/T: Streetsblog

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