Metrocosm’s new visualization shows how immigrants diversified America.

Despite predictions to the contrary, the path to the presidency for Republican candidate and nativist Donald Trump just got a little bit clearer. So there’s no better time for a reminder that most Americans came from somewhere else. This colorful new map showing two centuries of immigration to the U.S. by Metrocosm’s Max Galka does just that.

Much like this map of the frenzied U.S. migrant crisis, Galka’s map shows dots (each representing 10,000 people) whizzing toward the U.S., in colors corresponding to their countries of origin. From 1870 to 2013, as the net migration from a country increases, its color becomes more opaque. Here’s what that looks for 2005:

(Max Galka)

Sort of like in this infographic we’ve previously written about, Galka fits 200 years into one chart that shows these waves over time:

(Max Galka)

But if these waves of immigrants are represented as shares of the total U.S. population, which also grew over the past two centuries, a different picture emerges:

(Max Galka)

Check out the animated map here.

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