Soon riders will be able to grade their journeys—and the etiquette of fellow passengers.

Loving your bus driver’s atomic-clock timeliness, but hating that dude next to you eating what smells like a week-old squid sandwich? Public-transit users in San Francisco soon will be able to give cheers and jeers to both, with an official app that lets you rate your journey and the behavior of fellow passengers.

The rating feature will be bundled into an update to MuniMobile, a ticketing app for the city’s Municipal Transportation Agency. “It will help us better understand where and what the main issues are and to adapt accordingly and target messages specifically for these lines,” says Paul Rose, an SFMTA spokesman. Here’s more from the agency:

Rate My Ride will allow you to provide specific feedback about any Muni trip in seconds. With a simple click to the left or right, you can rate your trip time, vehicle conditions and even the etiquette of fellow riders.

Rate My Ride is just one more way we’re making it easier for you to tell us how we can improve your SF transportation experience. Rate My Ride is simple, it’s interactive—plus, you can’t beat MuniMobile’s cute interface.

The feature will apply to Muni buses, trains, cable cars, and paratransit vehicles, and should roll out late this summer. For the sake of future public-records requests, here’s hoping it will have the option to write specific complaints, whether it be for toenail cutters, seat hogs, sunflower-seed litterers, or people who treat public transit like their own traveling zoos.

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